Jobs for law graduates

The issue in Australia is not as stark as it currently is in the USA. But, as a recent article in The New Yorker suggests, many US law graduates are having difficulty finding jobs. Students with high levels of debt are left without a means of paying it back.

There are important differences differences between Australia and the US: (1) our fees are lower (for now), (2) law in Australia is an undergraduate degree, so many graduates choose non-law career paths, often treating law as a useful general degree rather than as a professional qualification, (3) the Australian economy is doing relatively well, and (4) some international students wish to use their degree in their home country, where demand may be higher. Nevertheless, on the numbers, there are still many more Australian law graduates than there are law jobs for graduate lawyers in Australia.

What is the ethical responsibility of law schools in Australia in this regard? Is it simply a question for “the marketplace” or should universities (typically funded on a per student basis) think carefully about appropriate numbers? Should weaker students (who are less likely to find employment) be provided with more help and advice?

Lyria Bennett Moses

The “Good Lawyer” Quiz

Two of my former colleagues from the UMKC School of Law, Professors Nancy Levit and Douglas Linder, recently published a book entitled “The Good Lawyer“, Oxford University Press (2013), which  “[t]akes the reader on a fascinating and insightful tour across space and time to uncover the qualities that make for the best lawyers” and “[o]ffers suggestions for concrete quality reforms while also exploring broader ethical issues.”

This book is, in some ways, a successor to their previous “The Happy Lawyer: Making a Good Life in the Law”, Oxford University Press (2010).

Levit and Linder have now provided in the ABA Journal a fascinating quiz (with answers) that highlights some of the  critical and at times surprising findings in the “Good Lawyer”.  It can also be taken interactively online.

While the book and quiz are necessarily US-legal practice focused, they will still be highly relevant to the practice of law outside the US, especially in other common law countries.

Colin B. Picker

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