Legal Writing Resources

Chantal Morton from the University of Melbourne has put together this very helpful list of resources for legal writing.  Many thanks Chantal!

  1. Professor Ellen Zweibel and Virginia McRae at the University of Ottawa Faculty of Law (Canada) have led the design of a great website with modules on how to write legal memos and edit your own work: http://pointfirstwriting.com/.  They are in the process of designing two more modules.  The resources are fantastic – and why reinvent the wheel?  I have been pointing my students to the resource ever since I heard about it at the Legal Writing Institute conference in Portland.
  2. I am in the midst of turning the 2015 Legal Writing symposium website into a blog with broader reach with respect to skills for law (https://skillsforlaw.wordpress.com/ ).  If you have any resources, articles, or websites you would like to see featured, please send me an email.  At the moment, we are storing some teaching modules from Charles Calleros.  I love using his exercise Rules for Lina (slightly modified for an Australian audience – feel free to contact me if you’d like the modified script and tips for having students role play Lina and her parent).  The videos will be posted in the new year.
  3. I just received my ‘holiday reading’ and thought I’d mention two Australian resources: a second edition of Nichola Corbett-Jarvis and Brendan Grigg, Effective Legal Writing: A Practical Guide (LexisNexis, 2nd ed, 2017) and the new book by Kenneth Yin and Anibeth Desierto, Legal Problem Solving and Syllogistic Analysis (LexisNexis, 2016).
  4. I am just back from a two-week stint at Stetson University College of Law (Florida).  Professor Kirsten Davis has put together a new project called Teaching Legal Writing: Out of the Box Ideas (http://www.stetson.edu/law/academics/lrw/teaching-legal-writing.php?ad=20160702).  You can email her directly for your free ‘box’ (kkdavis@law.stetson.edu) – I have already developed one of the activities for a workshop I am running for my JD and masters students in 2017.
  5. The Legal Writing Institute is primarily USA-based but the (free!) membership includes legal research and writing faculty from Australia, Canada and the UK (etc).  They publish some really interesting (and helpful) articles through the Legal Writing Journal and The Second Draft (I just happen to be one of the editors of the latter).  They also have something called The Idea Bank where legal research and writing teachers will post modules for others to adapt and use.  You can get access to it for free – just post one of your own modules (although if you are not ready to share, they’ll let you poke around without a contribution): http://www.lwionline.org/
  6. The LWI conference takes place every other year – so the next big one is in 2018.  In 2017, there are two related conferences you might want to consider: a) the Association of Legal Writing Directors has a few opportunities for professional development listed here http://www.alwd.org/events/ and b) the next Global Legal Skills Conference (easily the best conferences I have ever been to) takes place in March, 2017, in Mexico.  Details here: http://glsc.jmls.edu/2017/ (although keep in mind I am hoping to get them to come to Australia in 2018 so if you can’t make the trip to Mexico, keep a watch on the announcements for 2018!)
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